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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: Unlike the official response, these Panetta Review documents were in agreement with the committee's findings. That's what makes them so significant and important to protect. When the internal Panetta review documents disappeared from the committee's computer system, this suggested once again that the C.I.A. had removed documents already provided to the committee in violation of C.I.A. agreements and White House assurances that the C.I.A. would cease such activities.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: As I have detailed, the C.I.A. has previously withheld and destroyed information about its detention and interrogation program, including its decision in 2005 to destroy interrogation videotapes over the objections of the Bush White House and the Director of National Intelligence. Based on the above, there was a need to preserve and protect the internal Panetta Review in the committee's own secure spaces.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: The relocation of the Internal Panetta review was lawful and handled in a manner consistent with its classification. No law prevents the relocation of a document in the committee's possession from a C.I.A. facility to secure committee offices on Capitol Hill. As I mentioned before, the document was handled and transported in a manner consistent with its classification, redacted appropriately and it remains secured with restricted access in committee spaces.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: Now, the January 15, 2014 meeting with Director John Brennan. In late 2013, I requested in writing that the C.I.A. provide a final and complete version of the internal Panetta review to the committee, as opposed to the partial document the committee currently possesses. In December, during an open committee hearing, Senator Mark Udall echoed this request. In early January, 2014, the C.I.A. informed the committee it would not provide the internal Panetta review to the committee, citing the deliberative nature of the document.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: Shortly thereafter, on January 15, 2014, C.I.A. Director Brennan requested an emergency meeting to inform me and Vice Chairman Chambliss that without prior notification or approval, C.I.A. personnel had conducted a search -- that was John Brennan's word -- of the committee computers at the offsite facility. This search involved not only of searching documents provided by the committee by the C.I.A. but also a search of the stand-alone and walled-off committee network drive containing the committee's own internal work product and communications.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: According to Brennan, the computer search was conducted in response to indications that some members of the committee staff might already have had access to the internal Panetta review. The C.I.A. did not ask the committee or its staff if the committee had access to the internal review or how we obtained it. Instead, the C.I.A. just went and searched the committee's computers. The C.I.A. has still not asked the committee any questions about how the committee acquired the Panetta Review.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: In place of asking any questions, the C.I.A.'s unauthorized search of the committee computers was followed by an allegation which we now have seen repeated anonymously in the press, that the committee staff had somehow obtained the document through unauthorized or criminal means, perhaps to include hacking into the C.I.A.'s computer network. As I have described, this is not true. The document was made available to the staff at the offsite facility and it was located using a C.I.A.-provided search tool, running a query of the information provided to the committee pursuant to its investigation.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: Based on what Director Brennan has informed us, I have grave concerns that the C.I.A.'s search may well have violated the separation of powers principles embodied in the United States Constitution, including the Speech and Debate Clause. It may have undermined the constitutional framework essential to effective congressional oversight of intelligence activities or any other government function. I have asked for an apology, and a recognition that this C.I.A. search of computers used by its oversight committee was inappropriate. I have received neither.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: Besides the constitutional implication, the C.I.A. search may also have violated the Fourth Amendment, the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, as well as executive order 12333 which prohibits the C.I.A. from conducting domestic searches or surveillance.
Dianne Feinstein
U.S. Senator (D-CA), Chairman of Senate Select Committee on Intelligence
CSPAN2 03/11/2014
Feinstein: Days after meeting with Director Brennan, the C.I.A. Inspector General, David Buckley, learned of the C.I.A. search and began an investigation into C.I.A.'s activities. I have been informed that Mr. Buckley has referred the matter to the Department of Justice, given the possibility of a criminal violation by C.I.A. personnel. Let me note, because the C.I.A. has refused to answer the questions in my January 23 letter and the C.I.A. Inspector General is ongoing, I have limited information about exactly what the C.I.A. did in conducting its search.
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